Competition Law/ Anti-Monopoly Law

The automobile industry has been under the radar of China’s antitrust enforcement for a number of years. Since 2014, the agency had successively issued fines against many players in the automobile supply chain, including auto parts manufacturers, and motor vehicle suppliers and distributors. By November of 2019, the aggregate antitrust fine in the car sector

Authors: Song Ying,  Yang Yuhui, Hannibal El-Mohtar

(Attribution: George Becker)

Antitrust law is growing in importance in China. Penalties from Chinese antitrust cases continue to grow, and Chinese regulators are known for taking swift action against conduct they believe is anticompetitive. In February 2015, Qualcomm paid almost $1 billion US to end an investigation by

Although at the backdrop of Covid-19 outbreak, China’s merger review practice has not been negatively affected. Currently, the average review time is 8 days shorter than that in last year. According to public statistics, the first quarter of 2020 witnessed completed review of 111 filings by China’s antitrust authority, the State Administration for Market Regulation

Authors: Zhan Hao, Song Ying, Yang Zhan

On January 2, 2020, the State Administration for Market Regulation (“SAMR”) officially published the Draft Amendment to the Anti-Monopoly Law (“Draft Amendment”) in order to solicit public opinions, showing the authority’s sharp claws toward monopoly behaviors. This significant development is based on a 12-year-long

2019 is the first year since the re-organization of China’s antitrust enforcement agency was completed. New legislations and enforcement actions during the past year have thus attracted much attention from practitioners and in-house counsels, with a view to gaining an insight into the enforcement trends and priorities, if any, of the new agency. This article

China requires mandatory notification of mergers that meet certain thresholds. This notification duty is coupled with a standstill obligation, that is an obligation not to put a merger into effect until it is approved. Violation of the obligation to notify a merger and of the standstill obligations are commonly called gun-jumping and can subject to

Michael Gu / Sihui Sun[1]

Introduction

In 2018 the Anti-monopoly Law celebrated its 10th anniversary. Further, the antitrust enforcement functions of China’s three former antitrust agencies (ie, the Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM), the National Development and Reform Commission and the State Administration for Industry and Commerce) were consolidated into the new State Administration for

Zhan Hao, Song Ying, Yang Zhan

The year 2018 should be a milestone for Anti-Monopoly Law of the People’s Republic of China (“AML”) enforcement and development in China.

On May 9, 2018, the newly established State Administration for Market Regulation (“SAMR”), as a sole Chinese antitrust and competition authority, has

Michael Gu and Charles Xiang

Introduction

On 20 July 2018 the State Administration for Market Regulation (SAMR) published a decision fining two Shenzhen tally companies a total of Rmb3,163,108 for entering into a horizontal monopoly agreement[1]. According to the decision, China United Tally Shenzhen and China Ocean Shipping Tally Shenzhen reached and implemented