Bo Hu

On March 15, 2019, China’s national legislature, the National People’s Congress passed the Foreign Investment Law (the “Law”), a landmark legislation that will provide stronger protection and a better business environment for foreign investors. The Law will take effective on January 1, 2020. Upon its effectiveness, the Law will replace China’s current foreign

Simon Li, Susie Shi

In the Year 2018, China has promulgated a series of new regulations and policies in relation to foreign investment, which indicates the government’s determination to further expand market opening-up, attract foreign investment and inject new impetus into market competition and innovation.

Set forth below is a timeline of the major foreign

These incentives are clearly response of the Chinese government toward the exodus of foreign investment in recent years. We see signs of relaxed control over the commercial activities in general, stronger intention to protect IPR, and national treatment to FIEs in areas like R&D. However it is more accurate to say these policies are currently

  Authored by Simon Li (lixiameng@anjielaw.com) and Bo Hu (hubo@anjielaw.com) at AnJie Law Firm

Over the Year 2016, the Chinese government has overhauled its regime of administration over foreign direct investment (“FDI”) by promulgating a series of amendments to laws and new regulations to introduce a record-filing process to replace the pre-approval process,

Authored by REN Gulong(rengulong@anjielaw.com) at AnJie Law Firm 

The State Council, China’s cabinet, released on 18 November 2014 a List of Investments That Requires Governmental Approval (2014 version) dated 31 October 2014 (“2014 List”).  The 2014 List provides a much shorter list of investments projects needing government approval.

 

In the 2014 List, except for investments in sensitive countries or regions or investments in sensitive industries, which are still subject to approval by National Development and Reform Commission (“NDRC”), no governmental approval will be required for any outbound investment (“ODI”) by Chinese investors. Filing with NDRC will be required for any outbound investment above US$ 300 million


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China has experienced unprecedented growth in the insurance field. The total amount of premiums reached 100,611,940,000 USD in 2007. The total amount of premiums reached 80,672,020,000 USD in 2006 ranking it eleventh out of all countries in the world. Moreover, the total financial holdings of insurance companies in 2007 amounted to 414,756,056,000 USD, one-third larger than total holdings in 2005. Presently, there are more than 100 insurance companies in China, and more than 3000 insurance intermediary companies which include businesses specializing in broker, agency, and loss adjuster services.


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